Why “your intent” in critical in sales

In a sales career spanning 30 years I have found the most important predictor of success is your intent going into a sales meeting and the frames you set with your prospect from the outset.

Realise, the person who sets and controls the agenda and frames the meeting is going to win.

 

Transcript

This is Rashid Kotwal.

In a sales career spanning 30 years I have found the most important predictor of success is your intent going into a sales meeting and the frames you set with your prospect from the outset.

Realise, the person who sets and controls the agenda and frames the meeting is going to win.

Take just a moment and identify the frame that you’re starting with.

Is it “I’m here to help you get what you want. I am the expert in this field and I work with people who understand that and can take advantage of what I offer them”

Or, “I want to find out what you need?’

The first squarely puts you in the picture as an advisor who will help your prospect get what they want.  You are intrinsically part of the solution.

The second where you want to find out what your prospect needs is just gleaning information.  But information doesn’t lead to action and you’re not part of the solution.

It’s a very subtle, but critical distinction.

Setting a frame where you are in control and there to provide a solution is not about a power trip or manipulation.  Absolutely not.

This is about coming to the table with a strong resolve and negotiating position.

If you don’t take this position, you run of the risk of succumbing to your prospect’s frame of “Prove to me why I need you or why I should use you.”

Which gives away your authority and psychologically puts you squarely on the back foot as the supplicant.

Remember, your prospects are looking for you to lead them to a solution.  That’s why you’re there.

Your goal here is one of positioning yourself as the trusted authority.  Someone who can help your prospect achieve their outcomes.

Now you’ve got your attitude squared away, let’s move onto how you verbally frame the meeting.

Your role is to provide structure for the meeting.  Your prospect’s role is to fill in the content.

Say something along the lines of, “In this meeting I’d like to start with a quick bit of background about me (or our organisation), then discuss your challenges and if there’s a good fit, how we could help solve them”.

Think in terms of what would be of interest to your prospect.  What’s in it for them to listen to you.

Speaking about you and your background or history is designed to give your prospect confidence that you didn’t fall down from the last shower and establish your credibility.

Use social proof by giving them two or three quick examples of how you’ve helped similar organisations solve similar issues to theirs.

Finally talk briefly about your approach when working together.

All of this should take only a couple of minutes.

As the saying goes,  You never get a second chance to make a first impression. I’d go even further and say, You never get a second chance to powerfully, persuasively, positively set the first frame with yourself as the solution to your prospect’s needs and wants.

Till next time, this is Rashid Kotwal.

Share this...
By |2018-11-15T17:10:34+11:00November 15th, 2018|Mindset, Practical Tips, Sales, Video Carousel|0 Comments

About the Author: