The “IDS” decision making process

This is the final in our three part series on how to make good decisions and become a better leader.

In part one I covered why having a clear vision, core values, focus and mid to long term targets allows you to make better decisions.  I also spoke about the importance of taking time out to just think.

Part two went over the 10 commandments of good decision making.

Now let’s cover the process.  How you get efficient at making good decisions.

Transcript

This is Rashid Kotwal.

This is the final in our three part series on how to make good decisions and become a better leader.

In part one I covered why having a clear vision, core values, focus and mid to long term targets allows you to make better decisions.  I also spoke about the importance of taking time out to just think.

Part two went over the 10 commandments of good decision making.

Now let’s cover the process.  How you get efficient at making good decisions.

There are two parts.

The issues list and the process to solving  them.

The first thing you and your team must become comfortable with is putting issues on the table without feeling you’re going to get shot.  Ergo, you must foster an organisational culture of openness and honesty where everyone no matter how senior can be held accountable.

Given this you break your issues into short and mid-term lists.

Mid-term is anything that can’t be solved this week or this quarter.  This list is where you keep track of them.

Short term weekly leadership lists include anything that needs to be solved in the next week to quarter.  These are mainly strategic in nature.

Once you have your issue lists, you move into the process of solving them.

There are three steps.

One.  Identify.

Two.  Discuss.

Three.  Solve.

Start with the most important issue.  A filter is if this issue is both important and urgent.

Identify what the real issue is.  The surface symptom is rarely the real issue.  Look for the true cause.  Most often this is people.  So talk about the elephant in the room.  Now, people may get uncomfortable, which is why it’s so important to have a culture of openness and honesty without people pointing fingers or justifying themselves.

Getting to the root cause may take a while, but that’s okay.  There’s no point in treating symptoms.

Once you have the root cause, discuss solutions.  But don’t go round in circles.

Sometimes the solution will be obvious, albeit painful, especially if it involves moving someone from a role.

Remember you’re working towards the greater good, and it’s necessary to take short term pain if that provides the solution.

Now solve the issue.

Make a decision.  Decide on who’s responsible and accountable for carrying it out.

Solving issues can take time.  But doing so now you’ll save time exponentially in the future by eliminating future symptoms and other sub issues which will come back to bite you.

One last thing.

When discussing the issue, don’t go off on tangents trying to solve other stuff that comes up.  Stick with the issue in hand and get it done.

Now I hope you’ve found this series useful.  As always I welcome your comments.  And if you would like help improving your leadership and decision making, leading to sustained growth, give me a call.

Details are on our site, revealedresources.com where you can find part 1 and part 2 of this video as well.

Till next time, this is Rashid Kotwal.

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By |2019-01-31T10:39:05+11:00January 31st, 2019|Mindset, Practical Tips, Video, Video Carousel|0 Comments

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